Windows

 "...Windows are generally one of three types: fixed, hung and casement. Fixed windows do not open, hung windows slide up or down, and casement windows open outwards. Windows were single-glazed until the 19th century, meaning that the panes of windows were a single thickness of glass. With industrialization came innovations in energy conservation, and window manufacturers began to use double-glazing, with the sealed space between the two layers of glass acting as insulation..."

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A Matter of Style: Richardsonian Romanesque

 "...The Romanesque Revival style is characterized by masonry construction and the general use of the semi-circular arch for all wall openings and decoration. Asymmetrical organization, both in plan and elevation, is common to the style. Belt courses, or decorative stone courses that run horizontal across the entire building or major portions of it, are also prevalent. Falling just below the eaves, arcaded corbel tables are often found on the gabled facades of revival churches. Finally, medieval ornaments such as quatrefoil windows and geometric brickwork are often a part of the revival style..."

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Details: Lintels

 "...A lintel is a horizontal structural member (such as a beam) over an opening, which carries the weight of the wall above it. Lintels are usually associated with windows, though such structural members apply to any weight-bearing element or elements over an opening in a wall. They serve as much of an aesthetic purpose as a structural one. Lintels give a visual representation of how the load of the wall is carried across a window opening and down the walls on the sides..."

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Details: Signage

 "...Signage can refer to many advertisements, both in location and in type that a building may have. There are six types of appropriate signage: a signage band, a blade sign, an awning band, a window logo, a postal number, and a memorial plaque. These six types cover the range of signage scales necessary for advertising to different modes of transportation or circulation..."

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